USB microphones are the most convenient way to record a podcast. Simply connect them to the USB port on your computer and press record — no additional gear required. Yet while USB microphones offer an easy, plug-and-play solution for podcasting, they don’t provide the versatility required to pull off larger productions. For that, you’ll need an XLR microphone.

In essence, we’re saving the label that work of shopping around. On the other hand, we also master the tracks specifically for vinyl and offer graphic design services to create the cover artwork well before a pre-order campaign ends so that all the materials and files are ready to be sent to the pressing plant as soon as the run order is fulfilled.

Due to the way that YouTube’s algorithms have recently started moving users around based on several years worth of tracking their preferences, recommending content that is not always the obvious next step (because if you simply want the next track on an artist’s album, you’re probably already on Spotify), and then leveraging “discovery results” that are considered successful, thousands upon thousands of listeners streaming long-playing ambient music and sounds have been led directly to user Jackamo Brown‘s upload of Through the Looking Glass. The record had found its audience.

Rap name ideas

Say what you will about the life of blogs, but even today with all the power that streaming services like Spotify yield for discovering new music, you can’t take away the power of a well-written review or feature, and the influence that individual writers have over whether or not we decide to listen to a new track.

In essence, “Mary Had a Little Lamb” is an example of this structure. It’s the same melody again and again, but with different lyrics. Another famous example might be “Blowin’ in the Wind” by Bob Dylan.

Every time you touch a turntable, it makes the record go out of sync. Then you have to be very careful to line it back up again. And I’m not even trying to use the crossfader yet. This is all clearly going to take some serious practice.

Is there anything more iconic than Prince singing “Purple Rain” in the rain, at Super Bowl XLI?!! Not for the Soundfly staff! It was a rainy day, anyway, but when someone from the Super Bowl entertainment staff asked Prince if he was okay playing in the rain, his response was, “Can you make it rain harder?”

By now, I’m sure you’ve heard the news that the once-great music-centric crowdfunding platform, PledgeMusic, has filed for bankruptcy, concluding some tumultuous and complicated financial events. The company is accused of using artist-raised campaign funds to make corporate payments and top up operating costs, among other unsound (potentially fraudulent) business practices that have many, many artists and fans pointing fingers and scratching heads, wondering where their earned and owed money is.

Grants for artists painters

“Perfect”: The pre-chorus section here does something fun, changing up about half the lyrics to make it kind of like a pre-chorus/verse hybrid type thing. I can’t remember when I’ve seen that before, at least not to this degree of lyrical tinkering.

Freewriting is the act of nonstop writing for a predetermined amount of time without concern for grammar, quality, or any other regulations. Initially, this can look like some serious word-vomit, but if you keep going, you’ll often find yourself coming up with interesting ideas, or finding momentum on specific topics. Much like stretching before exercising, this process can kick-start your creativity and help you overcome any feelings of self-criticism.

As they used to say on MTV, “Too much is never enough” — especially when it comes to the ways you can re-record and sell your music. Top-selling artists release multiple versions of both hits and deep cuts to present different versions of their songs and put a new spin on lesser-known tracks. You can remix a song and take the lyrics away, and release an instrumental version you could license to film or TV programs. Or how about stripping down your sound and releasing an acoustic, unplugged version?

“Finesse” (Remix): Cardi B drops herself into this remix in a relatively extended intro. There’s also a pre-chorus, as well as a fake-out bridge which I’m going to call a “pre-bridge” (P2). My favorite part of this section, this song, and maybe this entire study in general, is that just when you think the whole thing is going to be done over the three-chord loop of♭VI  V  i, they throw in a ♭vii to ♭III turnaround, or, for the functionally minded, a “ii  V  I” that resolves back to D♭. This tonal trick, as well as the extensions and voicings, are really typical of the era they’re harkening back to in the video. Super clever.

Famed for her 2014 opera Harriet Tubman: When I Crossed that Line to Freedom, Dr. Nkeiru Okoye’s music has been described as “emotionally charged and musically sublime.” Okoye also cites inspiration from a dizzying range of influences including Gilbert and Sullivan, Gershwin, Sondheim, Copland, gospel, jazz and yes, even Schoenberg. Born and raised in New York, the composer studied piano at the Manhattan School of Music Preparatory Division and later at the Oberlin Conservatory of Music where she completed degrees in Music Theory and Composition. Okoye later went onto complete her PhD at Rutgers University. Her varied and well-crafted music sits nicely in a diatonic framework, making it easily accessible and highly enjoyable for a range of audiences. With music as captivating and loud as her recent opera, I believe we’ll be hearing a great deal from Dr. Nkeiru Okoye.

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